Review

April 19, 2012, 8:30am

See-Through Fantasies: Mirage at James Harris Gallery

The concept of the mirage is one of intrigue, as evidenced by pop culture’s frequent attempts to define its mystery. A floating desert oasis memorably deceives Daffy Duck into inhaling a mouthful of sand  (“Aqua Duck,” 1963), while Steve Wynn’s Mirage casino enchants Las Vegas visitors with its lush terrarium and waterfall-lined swimming pools.  Within the context of such widely known references, the question of how the mirage can function within a painting is an interesting one posed by James Harris Gallery’s group show focused on this theme.  –Erin Langner, Seattle Contributor

Listed under: Review, Seattle

April 18, 2012, 8:15am

Holly Coulis’ Fruits and Florals at Cherry and Martin

Walking into Holly Coulis’ solo show at Cherry and Martin, I was surprised to see a majority of large, boldly imagined paintings of flowers, fruits, and vegetable still lifes interspersed with and handful of blurred, dulled landscapes. - Ellen Caldwell, Los Angeles Contributor

Listed under: Los Angeles, Review

April 17, 2012, 8:15am

The Limitless Possibilities of Firelei Báez at the Richard Heller Gallery

Firelei Báez’ solo show “Not Even Unalterable Limitations” at the Richard Heller Gallery is saturated with dense color and rich content.  While at her show, I repeatedly heard the muffled sound of visitors oohing and aahing their awe and approval from the gallery’s large entryway, before even fully stepping inside.

Listed under: Los Angeles, Review

April 13, 2012, 8:15am

Of This World: Tom Green at Curator’s Office

“Time is of the essence now.” Most of us will never fully grasp the weight of Tom Green’s words when he spoke to the Washington Post last December.

Listed under: DC, Review

April 11, 2012, 8:15am

Spirit Level at Gladstone Gallery

Walking into the Spirit Level, on view through April 21, at Gladstone Gallery’s 24th Street branch, one passes through a hallway of Ann Craven’s large, dark paintings with taffy-colored off-white holes in the middle. The floor is lined with Latifa Echakhch’s “Frames”: rectangular rugs with the centers removed, so that only thin edges and fringes remain.

Listed under: New York, Review

April 05, 2012, 8:15am

Sweet Water: Carl Baratta at Lloyd Dobler Gallery

Carl Baratta’s current solo show at Lloyd Dobler Gallery is a fresh blend of old and obscure references. His work is steeped in painting history, the kind that exists in the back corner of the basement section in the library. In his studio you will find printouts of old alchemy prints, Moghul miniatures, and lesser-known Fauvist paintings. Lately Baratta has been using a lot of egg tempera, watercolor, and gouache on panel. The surfaces are rich with layers upon layers of transparent colors that give the illusion of depth while also maintaining a graphic, or illustrative quality.

Listed under: Review

April 04, 2012, 8:15am

Lichtenstein’s Landscapes in a Chinese Style at Gagosian

Roy Lichtenstein’s “Landscapes in a Chinese Style” at Gagosian Gallery’s 24th Street branch (exhibiting through April 7th) have more to do with style than they do with Chinese landscapes. Lichtenstein’s series of paintings, collage, and sculpture, leading up to his death in 1997, is a very logical chapter in his stylistic approach to genre, which Gagosian has presented in a steady succession of shows.

Listed under: Review

April 03, 2012, 8:25am

War, Peace, and Cleon Peterson at the Guerrero Gallery

At San Francisco’s Guerrero Gallery, Cleon Peterson’s “The Brinksman” brings viewers into a binary world.  It’s black and white.  It’s black and red.  It’s haves and have-nots.  It’s suitless and suits.  It’s men and women.  And it is completely without boundaries.

Classical statues intersperse a world that has been turned upside down.  People are slaughtered, hung from nooses, decapitated, and wounded throughout the exaggeratedly two-dimensionally flat world framed in Peterson’s paintings.  It is clear that when the “brinksman” are free and on the loose, no one else is.

Listed under: Review

March 27, 2012, 8:15am

The Frozen Moment: Nick Brown at Tiny Park

The human experience, how we navigate through this turbulent world, interacting with society and nature, and our destined demises—all this dwells within Nick Brown's affective canvases. Not to say the lot are sombre: this array of paintings and pastel drawings at Austin's Tiny Park conjure a spectrum of complex emotions befitting their varied imagery. If a picture is worth a thousand words, Brown's works embody infinitely more. - Brian Fee, Austin Contributor

Listed under: Review

March 07, 2012, 8:15am

Masquerading Fiction: Dawn Black at Curator's Office

Dawn Black’s second solo show at Curators Office in Washington, D.C. doesn’t veer too far from her first go in 2009.

Listed under: Review

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