Review

September 28, 2012, 8:25am

The Space Between: Julia Mangold’s Drawings and Sculpture

The three largest sculptures of Julia Mangold’s Drawings and Sculpture stare, despite being compilations of black, geometric fragments that do not readily read as anthropomorphic. These sculptures made of wood covered in a thick sheen of wax stare not only because they stand at eye level, but their physical masses also emit the weight and form of a standard human when standing beside them.  The block forms that comprise their structures protrude and retract strategically, shifting the overall sculptural shapes without giving any sense of being precarious; these staring stacks do not back down.

Listed under: Review, Seattle

September 26, 2012, 8:25am

Introspection's in the Details: Anthony W. Garza at Tiny Park

A solitary tree branch. A rocky shoreline. A bizarre animal-architectural amalgam. A night sky. As evinced from his exhibition at Austin's Tiny Park, local artist Anthony W. Garza depicts all these with understated reverence, via graphite, watercolor, and acrylics. The sum effect is a naturalistic cycle, engaging us and encouraging us to be more aware of the world around us. — Brian Fee, Austin contributor.

Listed under: Austin, Review

September 21, 2012, 7:20am

FOUR SHOWS: NYC

NYC Contributor, Whitney Kimball, visits four New York galleries including Bosi Contemporary, Picture Farm, James Fuentes, and Louis B. James. Read her exhibition reviews after the jump!

Listed under: New York, Review

September 20, 2012, 8:30am

Composing and Compositing for Reactions: Cordy Ryman

Scraps and discarded wood become remarkable, contemplative creations in Cordy Ryman's hands. His style bears some influence of dad Robert—connoisseur of white tones and alchemist with mounting implements—but Cordy is more likely to coat his second- or thirdhand lumber with dazzlingly colorful paint. Or he'll leave the wood bare to highlight its recycled history. Viewing Ryman's work, his relief-like paintings and painterly sculptures, in his second solo exhibition at Lora Reynolds Gallery is best done up close and personal. — Brian Fee, Austin contributor

Listed under: Austin, Review

August 29, 2012, 8:25am

From Print to Painting to Print: CTRL+P at Arlington Arts Center

Brian Chippendale came to prominence as a leading figure in the underground art and music scene that blossomed in Providence, RI during the 1990s. At the center of this creative explosion was Fort Thunder, an expansive live-work space co-founded by Chippendale in 1995 that occupied the second floor of an historic mill. Part performance space, part printshop, part residence, Fort Thunder was ultimately purchased by a developer and demolished in 2002, giving way to a supermarket and office supply store.

Listed under: DC, Review

August 14, 2012, 8:25am

Stacey Rozich’s “This Must Be the Place” at Chicago Urban Art Society

It’s not often that illustration succeeds in a fine art context, as illustration, didactic by nature, tends to be without the depth and subtlety we understand to be valuable in “fine art.” However, the illustrative practice of Seattle-based Stacey Rozich not only succeeds in the gallery, it thrives with narrative strength and a clear artistic vision that ranks her recent exhibition “This Must Be the Place” at Chicago Urban Art Society among the best exhibitions in Chicago this summer. - Robin Dluzen, Chicago Contributor

Listed under: Chicago, Review

August 13, 2012, 8:30am

Painting the Fourth Wall: Pull at G. Gibson Gallery

The jagged, orange mass of Seattle painter Blake Haygood’s This Only Seems Abnormal that writhes through a fantastical meteor shower exemplifies the theme of G. Gibson Gallery group show Pull. Evoking classic scenes of the Millennium Falcon being overtaken by tractor beams and meteor showers throughout the Star Wars trilogy, the sensory experience of a gravitational pull breaks through the fourth wall of Haygood’s canvas, the center mass so outrageously oversized against the smaller pieces of matter that its heaviness radiates from the canvas.

Listed under: Review, Seattle

August 10, 2012, 8:10am

Magic Eye: Op Art At Mixed Greens

“They may be cold, they may be as objective as a laboratory experiment, they may say nothing about the spiritual goals that have concerned great art of the past. But they are at least an art, or a craft, truly of our time,” John Canaday wrote in 1965 of MoMA's op art exhibition “The Responsive Eye.” Mixed Greens’s present show “Post-Op” (on view through August 17th) seems to second that thought for 2012, but this time, without the punch. Since being written-off by many critics, Op’s life has, for a while, popularly been linked more to drug culture andadvertising than the art world.

Listed under: Review

August 09, 2012, 8:20am

Guns, Art, and a Project by Ryan Carr Johnson and Samuel Dylan Scharf

There’s a long history of guns in contemporary art, from Chris Burden’s Shoot to Sophie Calle’s ballistic treatment of her lover’s letter in Take Care of Yourself to a myriad points in between. And the connection between guns and painting is no less direct.

Listed under: DC, Review

August 02, 2012, 8:25am

Looking at LA and Mexico: Two Group Shows, One City

Summertime in the gallery art scene often means a variety of group shows full of both new and established artists.  Culver City this month is no exception.  As I wandered from gallery to gallery, two shows that are just doors apart on South La Cienega really struck me, especially given their immediate juxtaposition and proximity to one another.

Listed under: Los Angeles, Review

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