Review

March 02, 2012, 8:15am

“Excavating Abstraction”: Zak Prekop at Harris Lieberman

The intense, ostensibly minimalist yet beguilingly layered and process-composed paintings by young Brooklyn-based Zak Prekop unveil themselves like a Jorge Luis Borges plot device. I spent a leisurely while in front of and angled toward his human-scale canvases filling Harris Lieberman Gallery, playing out different scenarios in my head as to just how he created them. Their plain titles give away few secrets, but their respective compositions and surface effects are irresistible to inquisitive eyes. - Brian Fee, Austin Contributor

Listed under: New York, Review

February 29, 2012, 8:15am

Another place and time: Ian Whitmore at G Fine Art

It wasn’t long ago that Ian Whitmore was selling out multiple shows in Washington, D.C. before his paintings were even hung for opening night. It may have been a sign of the times -- those shows at the now-defunct Fusebox gallery in the mid 00s were smack dab in the middle of the so-called great contemporary art bubble.

Listed under: Review

February 28, 2012, 8:15am

Controlled Chaos: John Cage at Crown Point Press

When one first encounters the prints by composer and artist John Cage, the lines, circles, and doodles that intermittently dot the pages could be described as simply abstract compositions. Some are monochromatic, others colorful. Some recall the sparse structure of a Jasper Johns, others the charred and distressed surfaces of a Robert Rauschenberg. While these artists were major influences in Cage’s life and work, the inclination to call the work derivative is hardly the whole story. - Nadiah Fellah, San Francisco Contributor

Listed under: Review

February 27, 2012, 8:15am

Creative Collagist: Chris Martin

There are several protocols to bear in mind before experiencing a Chris Martin exhibition. Take your preconceived notions of mixed-media painting and color combinations and chuck them out the window. Martin’s bold color choices are exceeded only by the media itself receiving the paint, which could be “just” canvas or an entire Oriental rug to the tabloid newspapers appearing here, his third solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. Brian Fee, Austin Contributor

Listed under: Review

February 24, 2012, 8:15am

Le Sigh: Gina Beavers at Nudashank

There’s no escaping the physicality of Gina Beavers’ paintings. Culled from the unremarkable -- quotidian moments and bits of cultural flotsam -- her work is grounded by the immediacy of her source material. Despite the occasional abstraction, these representations aren’t meant to veer far from their physical subjects; they’re tethered to experiential moments that are as concrete as the sculptural reliefs on her canvases. Indeed, borrowing from the pictorial language of naive painting, Beavers’ works suggest redemption for what’s unheroic among us.

Listed under: DC, Review

February 21, 2012, 8:15am

Terry Winters at Matthew Marks: Expressionism, Meet Science

On view at Matthew Marks are eleven large-scale paintings by Terry Winters. Each contains a web of diamonds, triangles, and rhombuses, which in places drift apart, and in others cling around invisible ripples, double-helixes, globes. Some are flat, chalky, and rug-like, while others recall wombs with thin, vibrant washes and cells in arranged in dimensional basket weaves. - Read more from NYC Contributor Whitney Kimball after the jump!

Listed under: New York, Review

February 10, 2012, 8:15am

Painting in Earnest: The 10th Northwest Biennial

This year marks the 10th annual Northwest Biennial hosted by the Tacoma Art Museum. Famously referred to as a “dusty old jewel” by former resident Neko Case in her song “Thrice All American,” Tacoma, Washington may not be the expected location for a major survey of contemporary work from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and, for the first time, British Columbia.

Listed under: Review

February 08, 2012, 8:15am

Sarah McEneaney at Tibor de Nagy

Throughout Sarah McEneaney’s modest-sized egg tempera paintings at Tibor de Nagy, we find a singular tourist: a middle-aged woman in water shoes, a bike helmet, rectangular glasses, sketchbook in hand, often surrounded by cats.  Her sunny landscapes and idyllic country living rooms throw a brightly-colored wrench into all standards of reticent, high art taste. - Whitney Kimball, NYC Contributor

Listed under: New York, Review

February 06, 2012, 8:15am

Joshua Abelow at Devening Projects + Editions

Devening Projects + Editions just opened up a solo show of Joshua Abelow's work entitled Songs From a Room. The exhibition features an assortment of Abelow's small-ish paintings spanning the last four years. I'm a big fan of Joshua's work, and the show is happening at an important point in his career; since his recent move to James Fuentes in NYC and the ever-growing popularity of his obsessively updated blog, ART BLOG ART BLOG, the name Joshua Abelow has been unavoidable.

Listed under: Review

January 30, 2012, 8:05am

The Physicality of Place: Daniel Heidkamp at Champion

Daniel Heidkamp's solo exhibition  at Champion (on view through February 25th) in Austin, TX highlights his strengths as a painter. I write this with the embedded pun fully in mind. He is a master of capturing light—whether tempering a fireplace's glow into this overall pulsing warmth or emblazoning a backyard with patterned tree-limb shadows. Heidkamp's light is an emotive presence throughout the excellently titled Glow Drops At The Chill Spot. - Read more by Austin contributor, Brian Fee, after the jump!

Listed under: Austin, Review

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