Noteworthy

May 23, 2014, 1:54pm

Alex Lukas: Converse Wall To Wall

Alex Lukas (NAP #92) is one of the most prolific artists I know. When he's not experimenting in his studio or attending an artist residency, he is driving across the country gathering images of the US landscape for inspiration. In fact, I bet if he's traveling by plane nowadays he's rather bummed out. 

To quote our publisher, Steven Zevitas, "In many ways, Lukas’ landscapes, which combine sites real and imagined - with a healthy nod towards Hollywood and art history - tell the end of the story, as man-made structures yield back to nature. The works pivot on series of dichotomies: violence and quietude; the manmade and the natural; hope and a profound sense of despair. They also grapple with ideas about national morality and societal fragility."

Boston, home of New American Paintings, was lucky enough to have him create an installation for the Converse Wall to Wall project. Check out these fantastic images of the installation process and final product. Enjoy! - Andrew Katz, Associate Publisher

If you're in town, here's where to go check it out in person.

All Photos By Ryan Sheapare and Alex Lukas.

Listed under: Noteworthy

May 06, 2014, 4:16pm

Hip to Be Square: The Work of David X. Levine

Since the late-1990s, New York-based artist David X. Levine has produced an extraordinary body of work that has continuously evolved. On the eve of his solo booth presentation at the 2014 NADA New York art fair, writer and critic Michael Wilson takes a look at the artist’s influences and – increasingly large-scaled - output over the past five years.


David X. Levine | Mary Brown, 2014, colored pencil and collage on paper, 50 x 52 inches.

Listed under: Noteworthy

February 25, 2014, 9:46am

40 Galleries You Should Know if You Love Paint: Redux

I put together my first selection of Forty Galleries You Should Know if You Love Paint in 2012. As with everything in life, a lot has changed in the art world over the past two years. Some of my favorite galleries have closed, including Harris Lieberman in New York City and the legendary Daniel Weinberg Gallery in Los Angeles, while some younger galleries have either suddenly appeared or have developed their programming in truly noteworthy ways.

Of all the changes since 2012, the most difficult has been the recent loss of the visionary and beloved New York art dealer who simply went by the name Hudson. His gallery, Feature, Inc., has been a critical part of the city’s frenetic art scene since the mid-1980s. Hudson brought early exposure to dozens of important artists, including Alexander Ross and Tom Friedman. In the past few years, his championing of mid-career artists such as Andrew Masullo and David Deutsch helped bring their work much-deserved attention. While Hudson will long be remembered for his impact on the art world, it is his quiet intelligence and gentle spirit that I will miss the most. There is no word yet as to what will become of Feature, Inc. – Steven Zevitas, Publisher


Elijah Burgher. Courtesy of Western Exhibitions (aka Scott Speh Gallery), Chicago.

Listed under: Art World, Noteworthy

January 17, 2014, 9:34am

The New American Paintings Reader’s Choice Winner Is…

Over 2,000 of you voted and selected Carlos Daniel Donjuan as New American Paintings Reader’s Choice Artist of 2013. Congratulations Carlos!

As this year’s winner, Donjuan will receive $500 in cash from New American Paintings and $1000 in gift certificates to our annual prize sponsor Dick Blick Art Materials.

After the jump learn more about the winner!

Listed under: NAP News, Noteworthy

January 15, 2014, 8:46am

Annie Lapin at Honor Fraser

You have seen Annie Lapin's (NAP #91) work in our magazine, and on our blog. See her work, in the flesh, at Honor Fraser in Los Angeles. Her exhibition, Various Peep Shows, is one of our Must-See shows for the month of January!

Check out this video we produced about her a couple of years ago with Future Shipwreck. And, below the jump, read more about her current exhibition.

Listed under: Noteworthy, Video

January 01, 2014, 5:07pm

VOTE NOW! NAP ANNUAL PRIZE: 2013 READER’S CHOICE POLL

Of the 240 artists featured in New American Paintings in 2013, twelve (two from each issue) were distinguished as being Noteworthy. And this is where it gets fun....now it is your opportunity to turn 12 artists into 1. Below, you will find 2013’s twelve Noteworthy artists listed, along with an image and brief commentary. One of these 12 artists will be named the New American Paintings Artist of the Year! In addition to being featured again in our 2014 June/July issue, the winner of the Reader’s Choice Annual Prize will receive a cash prize of $500 and a $1,000 Blick Art Materials gift certificate sponsored by:

Learn more about each artist after the jump!

Cast your vote by Wednesday, January 15th (Midnight EST). The winner of the Reader’s Choice poll will be announced on Friday, January 24th. 

Listed under: NAP News, Noteworthy

December 19, 2013, 3:59pm

14 Artists (+2) to Watch in 2014

Artists kept making paintings in 2013, and they did so in ever more inventive ways. If any single word can sum up the overriding concern of many younger artists over the past few years it is process. As of late, many painters have defined themselves not so much with a specific image or style, but with the way in which they go about “producing” their work. Fire extinguishers, bleach, the sun, printing technologies and even spaghetti have all been employed in the quest for aesthetic advancement. For these artists, the way in which an artwork is made becomes deeply embedded in the meaning of their work. The results of such technical explorations can occasionally come of as gimmicky, but, when successful, they can lead to extraordinary art and new ways of thinking about the medium of paint.

What does painting hold for 2014? If a quick survey of upcoming museum shows, including the 2014 Whitney Biennial is any indication, it will be more widely exhibited and talked about than ever, and mature artists such as Dona Nelson (a 2012 Painters to Watch pick) and Suzanne McClelland will, more and more, have their long overdue day. I will also go out on a limb and say that, after several years where abstraction has been the dominant language of painting, representational work will start to mount a comeback. Among the hundreds of artists I consider each year while publishing New American Paintings, I have noticed a considerable uptick in the number of young painters working with recognizable imagery, some in, dare I say it, almost traditional modes. (And yes, I am aware that representational painting never left, but the institutions that make up the so-called art world have been preoccupied with other things in recent years.)


Dona Nelson. Courtesy of Thomas Erben Gallery, New York, NY.  

Over the past year I conducted dozens of studio visits, traveled to numerous art fairs, and saw hundreds of gallery and museum shows. The list of Painters to Watch in 2014 is made up of some new discoveries, a few artists who, in my mind, presented breakout work this year, and a few old favorites who deserve wider attention. For the purposes of this list, I am defining the activity of painting as broadly as possible. Traditional definitions of media have become less and less important for emerging artists, and, no doubt, some of the listed artists would not consider themselves to be painters per se. - Steven Zevitas, Publisher

Who is on your list?

Listed under: NAP News, Noteworthy
Tagged as: NAP, Publisher, Must-See, 2014

December 11, 2013, 1:56pm

Kathryn Lynch’s Flower Paintings

Kathryn Lynch is an artist much concerned with illumination.  The trees and grasslands and waterways she paints are saturated with the glow of the sun or the shine of the moon; her portraits of New York buildings are abuzz with the colorful artificiality of city lights at night; and her recent series of tugboats show us vessels passing with dreamlike ease through ghostly-bright fog, or else bobbing gently on a shining Hudson, trapped between a giant red sun and that sun’s smudged reflection on the river.   In all of Lynch’s paintings there’s an interesting interplay of light and dark, and in the best of her work there’s also a sense of enlightenment – a feeling that behind her flat forms and lullaby colors, serious truths are layered. – Jonathan Lee, Guest Contributor


Kathryn Lynch | Blossom Explosion, 2012, 60 x 48 inches

Listed under: Noteworthy

December 10, 2013, 10:52am

Bodies of Work: Rebecca Campbell

Since her LA emergence in 2002, Rebecca Campbell (NAP #37) has been crafting sumptuous, painterly scenes that range from the poignantly quotidian to the kaleidoscopically fantastical.  The embrace of her paint handling and leaning towards large formats lend heroic, almost legendary proportions to the men, women, and children who inhabit what often appears to be a magically-real version of domestic, middle-class life.  But the dazzle of the paint does not distract or disguise – her pictures look in the eye what is often relegated to the nostalgic, the sentimental, and the emotional.  In the hands of a lesser artist, images of this sort frequently fall outside the purview of contemporary art.  Campbell, however, forges a meditation on autobiography that demands a closer investigation.  The depth of her imagery upends and reclaims motifs such as family, children, rainbows, fireworks, lightning bolts, and mushroom clouds with such deftness that their full meaning seem linked to their depiction in paint. - Jason Ramos, Los Angeles Contributor


Rebecca Campbell | Just Another Diamond Day,
2010, oil on canvas, 72 x 64 1/2 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of LA Louver, Venice, CA

Listed under: Noteworthy

August 30, 2013, 11:25am

Joan Brown: Artist Out of Water

The San Francisco painter Joan Brown achieved international recognition when she was scarcely out of her teens. By 1960, the same year she graduated from the California School of Fine Arts (now SFAI), she was represented by a major New York gallery, and was one of thirty-six artists included in the Whitney’s Young Americans exhibition. But even as she worked in San Francisco among a burgeoning cohort of fellow artists that included Elmer Bischoff, Jay DeFeo and Manuel Neri, Brown’s work developed in the following decades in a way that was distinct from others. Thinly brushed lines of enamel replaced her signature thick oil application, and shifting concerns in composition and tonal contrasts followed. However, themes within her imagery remained consistent even as her style evolved—namely, the reoccurring motif of water. Although many other California-based artists are known for their water-themed works—David Hockney for his swimming pools, and Richard Diebenkorn for his aquatic-framed cityscapes, among others—this running theme throughout Brown’s work is rarely given critical attention in the same way. - Nadiah Fellah, NYC Contributor

Joan Brown, Rio Vista, California, 1971; Courtesy of The Joan Brown Estate

Listed under: Noteworthy

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