NYC

March 23, 2014, 3:01pm

Homage to Exploration: Katia Santibañez at Morgan Lehman Gallery

As winter segues slowly into spring in New York City, Katia Santibañez's (NAP #104) latest suite of hypnotic investigations into the natural world instill warmth into our gray worldview and chilled bodies. Docere, Delectare, Movere, her fourth exhibition at Morgan Lehman Gallery, follows several months in Rome and a residency at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, imbuing this series with vitality and fearlessness in contrasting colors. — Brian Fee, Austin contributor


Katia Santibañez |
Interlude, 2013-14, acrylic on panel, 16 x 12”, image courtesy the artist and Morgan Lehman Gallery, New York.

Listed under: Review

March 12, 2014, 5:37pm

Highlights From Armory Week

Armory Week is a beast. After experiencing a non-stop visual bombardment of incredible artworks from around the world for three solid days, my eyes needed a rest. But once the art hangover subsided, I was surprised by the clarity I felt surrounding some of my favorite pieces.  A few were immediate hits, while others were slow burns I found myself mulling over long after the fairs ended. That being said, I wanted to share with you some of the artists who captured my attention, brought something new to the table, and prompted my weary eyes to un-glaze during this year's Armory Week. – Elizabeth Devlin, Boston Contributor


Tim Kent | Of Numberless Pleasures, 2013, oil on canvas, 100 x 60 in, presented by Slag Gallery, NY at VOLTA, courtesy of private collection

Listed under: Art World

March 11, 2014, 1:50pm

Pat Steir’s Fluid Reality

There is a notable heaviness present in the galleries of Cheim & Read’s Pat Steir show currently on view in New York. The weightiness is evoked not by any darkness, but by the unique paint application the artist employs in her large-scale canvases, in which she lets gravity dictate the way paint falls, spills, and spatters across the expansive surfaces. Sidestepping any didactic elements in her particular style of feminist practice, Steir instead employs an approach to painting that makes metaphoric references to the leaks, seepages and flows of the female body, seeking to draw out allusions to something that is more random, intuitive, and created by chance circumstances. Rejecting the traditional use of a brush to apply paint, Steir also stands against the myth of the male-artist-as-genius in her choice to abstain from the decisive action of placing paint on surface. Instead, the artist has devised a non-traditional approach, choosing to pour thinned paint from the top of her canvases while they’re vertically mounted on the wall.


Pat Steir installation view, Cheim & Read, New York.

Listed under: Review

March 10, 2014, 11:38pm

Whitney Biennial 2014

Finally, from my trip to NYC this weekend, my visit to the Whitney. I'm no critic, that is for sure. I have opinions but I'm not in a position to tell you what's good and what's bad. I can only show you what I liked, and highlight some pieces for you in case you can't make it. However, I will say that I found the Biennial a bit overcrowded with work. There was just too much. I think less is more, but look at some of the installation shots and see if you agree. Oh, and it was almost 80 degrees on the 4th floor, and I have evidence, so if you come across a shot of a thermostat, that wasn't a work of art. - Andrew Katz, Associate Publisher

Check out all of the photos that I took of the Whitney Biennial on our Flickr page.

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung (NAP #95)

Listed under: Art Market, Art World

March 09, 2014, 7:26pm

The Armory Show 2014

Back from New York and combing through hundreds of pictures. If you didn't make it to the Armory Show this year, or if you're looking for a refresher, check out my pics! Obviously, not everything, but things that caught my eye while browsing the fair. The images are on our Flickr page.

In the next few days I'll post some images from my trip over to the Volta Fair and Whitney Biennial.

Enjoy!

- Andrew Katz, Associate Publisher

Listed under: Art Market, Art World

March 09, 2014, 10:54pm

VOLTA 2014

Yesterday I posted pics from the Armory Show, and I hope you enjoyed them. Today I bring you shots from the Volta Show, one of my favorite fairs around. So many great artists, but these are some of my favorites...Take a look, maybe you'll see something you like. Tomorrow...Whitney Biennial. - Andrew Katz, Associate Publisher

Check out the photos on our Flickr Page

Alfred Steiner | Poulsen, Copenhagen

Listed under: Art Market, Art World
Tagged as: VOLTA, NY, NYC, Volta Show, Andrew Katz

February 12, 2014, 4:35pm

Iva Gueorguieva’s Surface-Effect

Iva Gueorguieva’s (NAP #73) paintings, on view at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe in New York, bring a breathe of California sun to our frigid New York winter. Working up the surfaces of her large canvases into almost a fetishized frenzy, the paintings are abstract, yet indicative of movement. By denying viewers the ability to rest their eyes on any one component for too long, her works are both mesmerizing and disconcerting, inducing frustration as one tries to pinpoint figures or structures within the compositions. Fractions, edges, and suggestions of such imagery exist, but are ungraspable as they dissolve into the chaos of each scene. – Nadiah Fellah, NYC Contributor


Installation view, Iva Gueorguieva at
Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, January 30 – March 8, 2014. Courtesy Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe.

Listed under: Review

February 10, 2014, 9:22am

Radcliffe Bailey’s Maroons

In Radcliffe Bailey’s (NAP #28) new exhibition, Maroons, on view at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York, the Atlanta-based artist challenges the dominant history of slavery, and probes the unexpected cultural interactions that it inadvertently promoted. The show’s title references the “maroon” communities of escaped African slaves that formed illicit settlements throughout the Americas and the Caribbean. The English name for these “maroons” comes from the Taíno word símaran, a word describing the flight of an arrow. Taíno is the indigenous culture and language of Caribbean islands like Hispaniola that the colonists first made landfall on, making it an appropriate root for the term. The title also primes viewers for the issues of displacement, diaspora, and migration that the works in this show primarily engage. – Nadiah Fellah, NYC Contributor


Installation view showing Vessel, 2012 (left), tarp, iron, vintage model ship, wicker basket and glass, 120 x 188 x 89 inches; and Pensive, 2013 (right), bronze and rough-sawn fir logs, 58 x 39 ¼ x 45 ¼ inches. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery.

Listed under: Review

January 27, 2014, 5:03pm

Robert Bechtle at Gladstone Gallery

Robert Bechtle’s works can often be dated by the make and model of the cars he chooses to include in his paintings and drawings. The small suite of recent drawings on view at Gladstone Gallery in New York are no different. The centerpiece of the show is aptly a large oil painting titled Bob’s Sebring, in which the artist depicts himself standing next to a silver Sebring convertible. Known for working from photographs for his intensely detailed works, the image represents a typically awkward moment. While the car is shown from an optimal angle, parked at a diagonal as one might see on a car lot or in a showroom, the artist’s pose is one of humble reserve, and stands in sharp contrast to the ostentatiousness of his new car. Positioned in the crook of the open car door, we are unsure as to whether he has parked his car just so for the photograph, or about to drive away. – Nadiah Fellah, NYC Contributor


Robert Bechtle |
Bob's Sebring, 2011, Oil on canvas, 40 x 57 3/4 inches, Courtesy Gladstone Gallery

Listed under: Review

November 25, 2013, 8:49pm

Shelley Reed’s In Dubious Battle

Recently on view at Danese Corey Gallery in New York, artist Shelley Reed’s mural-sized paintings evoke the work of realist French or Dutch paintings from a bygone era—although at a slight removal given their monochromatic palettes. Each section foregrounds exotic animals juxtaposed with still life scenes and set against expansive landscapes, which are dotted with Rococo and neoclassical architecture. The indulgent paintings are an amalgamation of art historical tropes, bringing to mind a myriad of references. - Nadiah Fellah, NYC Contributor


Shelley Reed |
Installation, In Dubious Battle. 2013, oil on canvas, 7'x47', Courtesy the artist.

Listed under: Review

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