Zoe Nelson

December 05, 2018, 12:09am

New American Paintings Alumni Take Over UNTITLED Miami

It’s that time of year again- Art Week Miami is upon us.  New American Paintings is trading in our winter coats for flip flops and jetting off to UNTITLED Miami.  Come with us as we see friends of past and present, starting with the 20 NAP Alumni booths you don’t want to miss:

 

1. Alex Jackson (Midwest #119)
Jenkins Johnson Gallery | Booth #D22

 

Trance Glance
2018
oil on panel
24 x 20 inches

Image courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery

January 23, 2014, 3:35pm

Perpendicular Painting: Zoe Nelson at Western Exhibitions

Record collectors are only ever concerned with what track is on the a-side. Not many will pay attention to, or often even know, what exists on the flip of their 45s. An exhibition of Zoe Nelson’s (NAP #95, #107) newest paintings, currently on view at Western Exhibitions, questions the very nature of a “good side.” My go-to reference for Nelson’s work has always been its lyrical qualities – though this exhibition references the history of that trope in painting as much as it does an x-y coordinate system. What better way to reference the spatial placement of the work than through its Cartesian properties? For Nelson, the grid is treated not as a pretext, but as a challenge. Paintings extend off the wall, appearing to fill the visual gap of the wall space left behind it – the sound or harmony within the work, if the exhibition has such an affect, directly plays off their relation to the viewer, as if the exhibition itself is a changing composition, shifting space ever so slightly as the viewer navigates around it.

While Nelson’s past paintings were entirely evocative of Supprematist abstractions, the new work exists more dimensionally, in the round. Favoring a democratization of space – or we could just as easily say the flipside – the “front” or the “back” of her paintings seem to not exist, or be discernable. There is an equality to the treatment of the painting’s entire surface area as an object that speaks to retelling of dated mid-century patterns and ideologies; a history of steadfast modernism unhinged from its context. In line with its audile perspective, the emphatic physical presence of the work maintains a discordant tension – at once occupying space, as it attempts to flatten it. – Stephanie Cristello, Chicago Contributor


Installation photographs by James Prinz. Image courtesy of Western Exhibitions and Zoe Nelson.

Listed under: Review

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