Heiner Contemporary

March 26, 2013, 8:30am

Matthew Smith's Concrete Abstract at Heiner Contemporary

Our DC Blog Contributor, Matthew Smith, has curated a fantastic group exhibition at Heiner Contemporary called, Concrete Abstract, which runs through April 20th. In the show, which includes artists Seth Adelsberger, Lisa Dillin, Jeremy Flick, Steven Frost, Sue Johnson, Becca Kallem, Patrick McDonough, Danielle Mysliwiec, and Matthew Smith, the curator "...explores the confluence of abstraction with the everyday" As the press release continues, "The works in the show cultivate a non-representational visual language that emerges from familiar ready-made objects, whether th

Listed under: DC

October 29, 2012, 8:30am

Gallerist at Home: Margaret Heiner

Nestled in DC’s Georgetown neighborhood, Margaret Heiner’s cozy gallery Heiner Contemporary, is quite perfect for a bustling college town, as it offers visitors young, fresh, and contemporary art.

Heiner has a keen eye for contemporary art, which at her home, serves as quite a compliment to her husband’s passion for Renaissance and Baroque art.  Together, their home reflects their combined love and zeal for art, while also showcasing their different tastes and preferences. – Ellen C. Caldwell, Los Angeles Contributor

Listed under: Gallerist at Home, Interview

December 20, 2011, 8:15am

By Any Means Necessary: Q&A with Chip Allen

Chip Allen’s letting loose. He’s squeegeed, splattered, and gesturally brushed over his geometric abstractions, and by the looks of it action painting’s winning out. His loose, intuitive marks and smudges run interference across seemingly systematic lines, the resulting balance a taut non-resolution that tugs from opposing ends, even if one end does so a bit harder. But there’s no subjugation here. Amalgamation is more like it, and a methodical contemplation on the all-encompassing potential of his medium -- oil in his most recent paintings.

Listed under: DC, Q&A

October 06, 2011, 12:10pm

The Writing’s on the Wall: a Q&A with David Kramer

Considering current events, it may be easy to wonder if David Kramer’s paintings have a slight political bent. Much like the characters in his work, we’ve had to collectively reassess our own aspirations amid the failed promises of the credit and housing bubbles. But taking stock of one’s own life is far from a political act, and Kramer’s work is probably too introspective to be social activism.

Listed under: DC, Q&A

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